Re¢ently

  1. Blocking adhesion in cancerous cells

    jake on 2003.06.06
    at 06:38 pm

    In mice they have successfully targetted a human protein to prevent the adhesion of cancer cells. This prevents cancerous cells from spreading to other parts of the body. It also helped reduce the size of the originating tumor in the mouse.

    Galectin-3 is known to play a role in cancer formation, particularly in promoting cell-to-cell adhesion. "The idea was to break that contact and inhibit secondary cancer formation," says Jarvis. So the team removed the key part of galectin-3 that normally allows cells to stick to each other. The modified protein also occupies the site on a cell's surface blocking normal galectin-3 from binding. This stops cells from adhering to each other.

    New Scientist

    Posted in: Science

     

    Comments (0)

    Comments have been automatically disabled to curtail spam.

by date

« Dec 2017 »
Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat
          1 2
3 4 5 6 7 8 9
10 11 12 13 14 15 16
17 18 19 20 21 22 23
24 25 26 27 28 29 30
31
today